About the
Herzog Court Guard

Herzog is the German term for Duke.
Maximilian Gradl (Managing Director) is looking forward to your visit together with his partners – Stefan Heck, Alexander Recknagel, Vanessa Zinoni and the entire Herzog team!

Modern meets history

The design of the Herzog Bar & Restaurant Munich, by Özgür Keles (Selektiv Studio), speaks volumes. The finest materials such as the bright, hand-cast and sanded terrazzo floor, the handmade lounge sofas or the clearly recurring element brass. Nevertheless, historical features were also used, such as the handmade tiles in the sanitary area, the numerous columns and of course the centerpiece: the bar counter, which was cast from black concrete. We see our dream of a timelessly modern bar more than fulfilled and look forward to many enjoyable moments in a very appealing ambience.

brand design

Timeless, beautiful & present. By internalizing these points, the Herzog has won the German Design Award three times since it opened.

The history of Maxburg

THE TEAM - OUR Herzöge (DUKES)

Federica Pulisci

manager

Maximilian Gradl

Executive Director

Marit Schön

chef

Stephen Heck

Partner

Florian Saxinger

bar manager

Alexander Recknagel

Partner | PR & Marketing

Vanessa Zinoni

Event Manager | partner

Our partners

Christian Hohe Nadel | Sparkasse BW

Sebastian Tewes | Beam Suntory

Sven Neumann | Campari

Christian Hohe Nadel | Sparkasse BW

Lukas Stojetz & Tobias Reich | Bar Brain

Heiko Esdar | Hofbrau

Erwin Rottmair | Object leasing

Christian Hohe Nadel | Sparkasse BW

Marcel Wanek | Fever Tree

Reiner Faltermeier | LVMH

Franz Stettner | Franz Anton

Christian Auer | RedBull

The Herzog's suppliers

It is the Duke’s aim to serve the guest only high-quality and delicious ingredients. Of course, we do not forget our environment and pay attention to sustainable and environmentally friendly production. That’s why our bread comes from regional & sustainable grain cultivation from the local bakery Brotzeit. Meat & fish, with the exception of international specialties, is sourced throughout Bavaria and the latter is of course MSC certified. Our fresh fruit & vegetables are sourced from the Munich company Fruitique, who made their name on the Viktualienmarkt. Textile goods and merchandise are manufactured by the Munich company Shirtplus.

The Maxtrem group of companies

The history of Maxburg

The former Herzog-Max-Burg was commissioned by Duke Wilhelm V of Bavaria. At about the same time as the Michaelskirche and the new construction of the Jesuit monastery on today’s Neuhauserstraße, the duke seems to have tackled his new palace complex. Essentially, the construction work concentrated on the years between 1593 and 1596. Through a passage, the so-called Wilhelm’s Arch, the Duke had access to the Jesuit monastery complex and the stately oratory above the Cross Chapel of St. Michael’s Church at all times. From the Maxburg, the ducal city gate in the second city wall led to the Capuchin monastery, which was the only monastery in Munich outside the city walls. As with the construction of the Michaelskirche, no responsible builder or architect can be proven. Certainly Friedrich Sustris and the Augsburg carpenter Wendel Dietrich, whose instructions the construction manager Wolf Miller had to carry out, at times bore special responsibility among the crowd of craftsmen and artists. Ultimately, Duke Wilhelm V determined the structural concept and the artistic program. 54 town houses had to give way for the construction.

The residence was initially called Wilhelminische Veste after its builder. The building was only given the name Herzog-Max-Burg in the 17th century, when Maximilian Philipp used it as a residence. While the (electoral) princely line resided in the Munich Residence, the Duke Max Castle was mostly inhabited by the non-ruling members of the Wittelsbach family until the 19th century. Queen Caroline was the last to live here as a widow until her death in 1841. After that, the Maxburg was used by civil authorities and the military until it was destroyed in World War II.

Today’s Neue Maxburg was built between 1954 and 1957 on the site of the Herzog-Max-Burg, which was destroyed in World War II, by the architects Sep Ruf and Theo Pabst. Only the renaissance tower remained from the previous historical building and stands free next to it. The building houses a number of shops on the ground floor as well as parts of the district court and the district court of Munich I on the office floors. The architects tried to make the coloring and grid of the remaining Renaissance tower the basis for the design of the new building. However, the construction remains transparent insofar as the reinforced concrete structure was not concealed but remains openly visible. The Moses Fountain by Josef Henselmann from 1955 is located in the inner courtyard.

The fully glazed BMW exhibition pavilion, which was modernized by Christian Bartenbach in 1986, is located in front of the Herzog-Max-Burg. Since 2015, the Bar Restaurant Herzog has been part of the history of the Maxburg, on Lenbachplatz.

opening hours

Tue – Thu | 17:00 – 1:00
Friday | 17:00 – 2:00
Saturday | 15:00 – 02:00

+49 (89) 29 16 10 29

opening hours

Tue – Thu | 17:00 – 1:00
Friday | 17:00 – 2:00
Saturday | 15:00 – 02:00

+49 (89) 29 16 10 29

The history of Maxburg

The former Herzog-Max-Burg was commissioned by Duke Wilhelm V of Bavaria. At about the same time as the Michaelskirche and the new construction of the Jesuit monastery on today’s Neuhauserstraße, the duke seems to have tackled his new palace complex. Essentially, the construction work concentrated on the years between 1593 and 1596. Through a passage, the so-called Wilhelm’s Arch, the Duke had access to the Jesuit monastery complex and the stately oratory above the Cross Chapel of St. Michael’s Church at all times. From the Maxburg, the ducal city gate in the second city wall led to the Capuchin monastery, which was the only monastery in Munich outside the city walls. As with the construction of the Michaelskirche, no responsible builder or architect can be proven. Certainly Friedrich Sustris and the Augsburg carpenter Wendel Dietrich, whose instructions the construction manager Wolf Miller had to carry out, at times bore special responsibility among the crowd of craftsmen and artists. Ultimately, Duke Wilhelm V determined the structural concept and the artistic program. 54 town houses had to give way for the construction.

The residence was initially called Wilhelminische Veste after its builder. The building was only given the name Herzog-Max-Burg in the 17th century, when Maximilian Philipp used it as a residence. While the (electoral) princely line resided in the Munich Residence, the Duke Max Castle was mostly inhabited by the non-ruling members of the Wittelsbach family until the 19th century. Queen Caroline was the last to live here as a widow until her death in 1841. After that, the Maxburg was used by civil authorities and the military until it was destroyed in World War II.

Today’s Neue Maxburg was built between 1954 and 1957 on the site of the Herzog-Max-Burg, which was destroyed in World War II, by the architects Sep Ruf and Theo Pabst. Only the renaissance tower remained from the previous historical building and stands free next to it. The building houses a number of shops on the ground floor as well as parts of the district court and the district court of Munich I on the office floors. The architects tried to make the coloring and grid of the remaining Renaissance tower the basis for the design of the new building. However, the construction remains transparent insofar as the reinforced concrete structure was not concealed but remains openly visible. The Moses Fountain by Josef Henselmann from 1955 is located in the inner courtyard.

The fully glazed BMW exhibition pavilion, which was modernized by Christian Bartenbach in 1986, is located in front of the Herzog-Max-Burg. Since 2015, the Bar Restaurant Herzog has been part of the history of the Maxburg, on Lenbachplatz.